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New Mr Gay Universe 2018 contest to be launched as an online pageant

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MrGayUniverseA new online pageant that is bound to energize the international gay community, inspire a flurry of drag queens and bears but test the mobilization skills of these contestants, is about to be launched globally.

The first Mr Gay Universe 2018 will be determined by how strong his social media following is and how good he is at convincing his followers to vote for him. Everything happens online.

The contest was created with the mind set of giving gay men a different kind of opportunity to be part of a global event. We will allow multiple entries from a country to give more gay men the opportunity to express themselves and be involved in the LGBTQ+ community.

Registrations will soon open and anyone from across the globe can enter. You send in your pictures and enter our various categories that vary from swimsuit, business wear to congeniality. Profiles of the successful entrants is then posted on our website for people to vote. The more votes, the better the chances of winning.

The contest aims to encourage an initiative of change and empowerment for gay men from all walks of life, attracting contestants of just about every part of the world.

This is a platform where strong spirited men from all of the world show us what they have, no matter their shape or size. There is a perception that only straight-acting men can enter contests. With Mr Gay Universe, anyone can enter. Drag queens, bears everyone is welcome as long as you are male.

This initiative is expected to create quite a buzz online with thousands of posts daily on social media.

Go to www.mrgayuniverse.com for more information 

facebook: www.facebook.com/mrgayuniverseofficial/
twitter: www.twitter.com/mrgayuniverse/
instagram: www.instagram.com/mrgayuniverse/
youtube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCDaVtFf0FxCQlpj0kiVsZbA

#MGU
#MrGayUniverse
#MrGayUniverseOfficial
#MrGayUniverseOriginal
#AcceptNOSubstitute
#TheAuthenticBrand

Mr Gay World 2019

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The coveted Mr Gay World 2019 contest dates have been officially announced.This prestigious contest, now in its 11th year, will be held in Hong Kong from 28 April to 4 May 2019. 

HK2019Last month, Hong Kong won the bid to host the contest. Hong Kong has also been chosen to host the Gay Games in 2022.
Follow up to date information on the Mr Gay World social media platforms Facebook as well as their website:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/mgworg/
Twitter: www.twitter.com/mgworg
Instagram: www.instagram.com/mgworg/
Youtube: www.youtube.com/user/mgworgofficial/
Website: www.mrgayworld.com

#MGW #MGW2019 #MGWHK #MGW #HongKong

Caster Semenya challenges new IAAF rules

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South African LGBTQ Olympian and sports icon, Caster Semenya, has formally challenge an attempt by international athletics bosses to force her to change her testosterone levels.

Semenya’s lawyer Gregory Nott of Norton Rose Fulbright, has filed a case with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland against controversial new International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) regulations concerning women athletes with high testosterone levels.CasterSemenya

The rules which were announced in April and are set to come into force in November, would force the 27-year-old track star to use medication to artificially lower her natural testosterone levels in order to be allowed to compete as a woman. Critics of the IAAF regulations argue that the basis of what is defined as a “normal” testosterone level is arbitrary and discriminatory. They also claim that the rules appear to specifically target Semenya and other women of colour from the global south. “Ms Semenya, like all athletes, is entitled to compete the way she was born without being obliged to alter her body by any medical means,” said the runner’s law-firm, in a statement. Semenya believes that the rules are a violation of her human rights and “discriminatory, irrational, unjustifiable” and that she is simply competing with her natural-born talents.

“I am very upset that I have been pushed into the public spotlight again,” said Semenya. “I don’t like talking about this new rule. I just want to run naturally, the way I was born. It is not fair that I am told I must change. It is not fair that people question who I am.” She added defiantly: “I am Mokgadi Caster Semenya. I am a woman, and I am fast.”

Semenya is a three-time 800m world champion and won silver at the 2012 Summer Olympics and gold at the 800 metre event at the 2016 Summer Olympics. In January last year, she followed her 2015 traditional marriage ceremony to longtime partner and wife Violet Raseboya with a ‘white wedding’ that made global headlines.

(This story in its original form first appeared on mambaonline.com)

ABFAB Drag Show at Artscape

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Cape Town has a scintillating drag tradition that dates back to the Thirties, especially in vibrant District Six. Today the pageants, the parties, the hair dressing salons and the fabulous drag queen shows still flourish across the city.Abfab

However, the shows are often hosted in backwood clubs, catering to a select few who know where to find them. The Absolutely Fabulous Drag Show endeavours to put the creme de la creme of drag on centre stage at the Artscape Theatre Centre. With fine feathers preened, false eyelashes fluttering and sequins glittering, the fiercely feminine/masculine are gathering to celebrate the world of `lip sync`, ambiguous seduction and gender identification.

The enigmatic Odidiva Mfenyana comperes the evening, as we also pay tribute to the late Reverend Rowan Smith. A surprise special guest also awaits you. Top class drag divas Vida Fantabisher, SA`s Got Talent 2016 runner-up Manila von Teez, as well as Kat Gilardi, Jayde Kay Johnson and Angel Lalamore of cabaret 3D trio fame, will showcase present-day glory. Camillo Lombard maintains a strict tempo while Basil Appollis stiches it all together and cracks the designer whip as director.   Show will be at Artscape in Cape Town on the 11th August 2018, with a show at 3pm and 8pm.

Tickets are available exclusively from Computicket at R100 each.

Equality Scrum Down

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By Tim Trengove Jones

 

Being as butch as I am, I obviously follow South African Rugby.GayRugbyKissScrum
This, I know, is a very compromising admission, but after all these years perhaps our readership will tolerate this idiosyncratic passion?
Recently, as some of you will know, Supersport experienced the embarrassment of having former Bok player and now commentator, Ashwin Willemse, stalk off the set alleging that Nick Mallet and Naas Botha, his two co-commentators, were condescending towards him. His ire seemed directly mainly at Mallet who, I must admit, I find very full of himself.
Predictably, a storm erupted. The two “white” men were accused of racism. A hearing was conducted by Supersport who, just recently, announced that Botha and Mallet had been exonerated of any taint of racism.
Willemse, however, refused to participate in the enquiry and his side of the story remains untold. However, we do know that, on a previous occasion, and in writing, Mallet had requested Willemse be replaced, claiming that he (Willemse) spoke “rubbish.”
Wherever we go in this country, shades of racism, or racism in the full glare of daylight, presents itself. This incident is a particularly interesting one to me. Rugby is easily and rightly seen as a bastion of White South African nationalism. Along with that, inevitably it seems to me, it is seen as a bastion of machismo, of heteronormativity, of hyper-masculinity. In these guises it might well be the antagonist of gayness.
Perhaps you recall the innuendos and rumours that swirled around former Bok winger, James Small. That his sexuality should have been an issue makes the point, doesn’t it? It is rather like the fussation that erupted when Bavuma scored his first century for the Proteas at the Wanderers: Much delight, and much commentary about a Black player scoring a century for the Proteas. That people made these kinds of noises is not, for me, a mark of progress, a celebration of diversity, not an indication of how far we have come, but how far we still have to go.
The same can be said of the Willemse issue. I don’t know the precise circumstances. Perhaps we never will know. But there, in a Supersport studio, as the Boks become more representative than ever of the diversity of this country, allegations of racism emerge.

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